Home - Caribu Horse Talk Knowledge Base - Horse Talk Knowledge Base - Horse Worming - New Thinking & Approach
About Caribu




Google Reviews
Read our Ebay Feedback
Have you used our 1200 Denier Waterproof Turnouts? What life span did you get from the waterproof denier?

Caribu Knowledge Base
Find us on Facebook
Purchase Gift Vouchers

Payment Methods

Horse Worming - New Thinking & Approach

Horse Worming - New Thinking & Approach
Category: Horse Talk Knowledge Base
Author Name:
Posted:
Views: 56837
Comments: 7 [Read/Post]
Synopsis:

There is a good chance your deworming strategy needs updating. Just because you deworm your horse — and he’s shiny and in good weight — doesn’t mean he isn’t full of worms.

Horse Worming - New Thinking & Approach

There is a good chance your horse deworming strategy needs updating. Just because you deworm your horse — and he’s shiny and in good weight — doesn’t mean he isn’t full of worms.

For years, all the books have told us that it is essential to do a horse worming treatment every 3 months. What isn't commonly known is that we should be rotating the horse wormers we use in order to minimize the risk of the development of resistant worms. This is called SLOW ROTATION and forms the basis for best practice rotational worming advice. This means that you should use one class of active ingredient for an entire year, and then switch to a different class of active ingredient the next year.

As is pretty obvious, worms will compete with horses for their food and, in some cases, suck the blood from the horse’s digestive tract, causing damage that will be permanent and can affect the horse secreting the chemicals necessary for it to digest its food properly.

Regular Faecal (Manure) Egg Counts

The only way to truly determine whether horse deworming products are working is to conduct fecal egg count reduction tests.

The new strategy for horse worm control strongly recommends the use of faecal egg counts (worm egg manure counts) to monitor the efficiency following worming and to identify individual horses in a group which have higher egg counts due to low natural resistance, close grazing habits which increases the ‘pick-up 'of infective larvae from pasture, as well as resistance build-up against a specific worming compound due to over-use and under dosing. Faecal Egg Count Reduction Testing (FECRT) can be used to monitor the seasonal prevalence of worms and response to a worming compound or combination of compounds.

Horse Worms
Conducting a fecal egg count

Monitor Worming Populations by Manure Egg Counts

It is helpful to identify the individual horses which have a naturally high burden of Small Strongyles despite regular worming by collecting droppings and performing Faecal Egg Counts (Manure Egg Counts). This is best carried out 6 weeks after the last worming with a 'azole' wormer and 10-12 weeks for a ‘mectin’, particularly the moxidectin compound, as these wormers can suppress egg reappearance for a longer period.

Horses with Strongyle egg counts above 200 eggs per gram at 6 weeks or 12 weeks after worming, depending on the wormer used, should be retreated. After 10-14 days following worming, allowing time for female worms not killed to start laying eggs again, collect droppings to check if the wormer has been effective and calculate the Faecal Egg Count Reduction percentage.

FECR% = Initial epg - After Treatment epg x 100

If the wormer used results in a 95-100% reduction in egg count after 10-14 days, it is not likely to have a build-up of worm resistance.
Ideally, an annual check should be carried out to monitor the effectiveness of the wormer against Small strongyles. Any wormer which fails to reduce FEC by at least 90% should not be use.

Rotation of Worming Compounds

It is commonly recommended to change to a different class of worming product every 12 months, in order to minimize the risk of the development of resistant worms. This is called SLOW ROTATION and forms the basis for best practice rotational worming advice. This means that you should use one class of active ingredient for an entire year, and then switch to a different class of active ingredient the next year.

It’s important to know that the majority of horse worming products currently on the market have one of two major classes of active ingredient – they are either avermectin (‘mectin’) based or benzimidazole (‘azole’) based. If you are currently using any wormer with an active ingredient ending in ‘...ectin’ then your rotational choices are limited to wormers that do not contain any actives ending in ‘..ectin’. This is regardless of the other active ingredients contained within the wormer. To make the correct choice you must change to a wormer with an active ending in ‘...azole’. There are other classes of active ingredient, but they are less commonly used and are generally used in combination with other actives to target specific parasites.

Follow the link to Caribu range of Wormers.


Product name

Active ingredient(s) (as of July 2013)

 

 

Panacur

Fenbendazole

Strategy-T

Oxfendazole and pyrantel

Equimec

Ivermectin

Equimax

Abamectin and praziquantel

Equest plus tape

Moxidectin and praziquantel

Ammo

Abamectin and morantel (like pyran

What are the types of worms that affect horses?

Small strongyles (cyathostomes): These are common and cause direct damage to the gut wall. The immature stages can encyst in the wall of the intestine for 1-2 months, and when they are released in spring, they can cause colic and diarrhoea. Resistance to anthelmintics (worming pastes) in these worms is becoming a serious problem.

Large strongyles: Some members of this group of worms invade the blood vessels supplying the intestines and can cause serious damage leading to colic, ill-thrift, diarrhoea and even death. Resistance is also increasing in this group.

Roundworms: These worms are generally only of significance in horses younger than 2 years. They can cause intestinal blockage, ill-thrift, diarrhoea, and even respiratory problems.

Pinworms: The most common sign of pinworm infection is tail-rubbing, due to the adult worms laying their eggs around the horse’s anus and causing irritation.

Tapeworms: These can cause colic, weight loss, diarrhoea, gut rupture and death. Their life cycle involves the orbatid mite that lives on pasture.

Bots: The adult bot is actually a fly that lays its eggs on the horse’s coat. These hatch into larvae and are ingested into the horse’s stomach, where they can cause ulceration and may even penetrate the wall of the stomach. Bots are extremely common in temperate climates.

To find out more about getting Faecal Worm Egg Counts done and other good horse worming info visit - http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/Worm-control-in-horses.pdf 

Please use this article as an information guide only. Please consult your vet for more specific advice for your situation or if you are concerned that your wormer is not as effective as it should be.

 

 

 

Comments on Horse Worming - New Thinking & Approach

Wendy Friday, September 16, 2016 01:07 PM
It Helps if you pick up manure or encourage native moorhens (redbills)... they are really good at scattering the manure and hence destroying the micro-environment for worms. Note... they seem to do this mostly in winter / cooler months.... so when they stop it needs to be collected. Also rotate paddock use , allowing other paddocks recovery time.... PASTURE MANAGEMENT is a useful tool.
ROSE CHARLTON Thursday, January 21, 2016 08:49 AM
I commenced my two horses on a Diatomaceous Earth worming programme 7 months ago ( mixed daily in feed) and the results are incredible, with fecal egg counts at zero. As a 'natural' based product there is not an issue with resistance.
debbie Tuesday, May 6, 2014 09:39 PM
Has any one heard of using blue stone to worm horses i think it may be the Pat Colby way?
Sharon Tuesday, December 31, 2013 08:49 AM
I think 2014 will need to be a azole year for my horses. Thanks fir giving me an easy way to remember to rotate!
Carolyn Monday, August 19, 2013 02:44 PM
Spoken to our vet just last week about worming he recommeded the same.
Elly Friday, August 16, 2013 02:59 AM
Very well written article
Kaytee Thursday, August 8, 2013 02:15 PM
This is interesting!!


Share your suggestions & experiences on this article.

Please dont post general questions. If you have a question please use this link

Your Name: *
Comments: *
Please Note: HTML Markup will be automatically removed.
The ability to post urls has been disabled by the site administrator.
*
Type the characters you see in the picture:

*